Of the Bark or Leaves of a Tree Called Baobab

[ Of the Bark or Leaves of a Tree Called Baobab ] Handley Chipman

Contributors
Contributor Role
Author
Contributor Name
Handley Chipman

Date: Written sometime in 1776. | 1776/01/01 to 1776/12/31

Publication Format
Manuscript

Type
Food
Medicine

Symptoms
perspiration
fevers
heat of urine

Ingredients
couscous
millet flour
lalo
baobab

Places
Senegal
Nova Scotia

Source: Handley Chipman's Notes, Vol. 2
Institution: Nova Scotia Archives | Source Origin: Chipman Family Papers | Reference: MG Vol. 218 / Microfilm Reel 10,154

Description

A description of the Senegalese practice of adding lalo to couscous for medicinal reasons. No. 205, p. 120.


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Transcription

Of the bark or Leaves of a tree^Baobabcalled
Mrs. Adamson, Saith the principal food
of the Negros at Senegal is called Couscous,
it is a kind of paste made of the flour of
Millet, into which some meat or fish is in:
:fused, Into this they always put two or three
pinches of Lalo, this is the bark or Leaves
of a tree called Baobab, dried in the Shade
and reduced to a Powder, which they keep
dry in Little Cotton Bags, without any other
care, they add this to their food, not to give
it a Relish, but to keep up a free perspiration
in their body’s, which is health to them, and
to Allay the too great heat of the blood, &c
Experience he faith hath taught him this
[ptisan] alone is^not onlysufficient to remedy
against ardent fevers, but also against th[e]
heat of Urine, which is frequent there from
July to Novr: the fruite of said tree he saith
is not less useful, then its Leaves, the pulp
has an agreable taste, but he saith wine
ought to be abstained from &c.