Doses

[ Doses ] Sarah Creighton Wilkins

Contributors
Contributor Role
Compiler
Contributor Name
Sarah Creighton Wilkins

Date: Late 18th or early 19th century; exact date unknown.

Publication Format
Manuscript

Type
Medicine

Symptoms
indigestion
flatulence
strangury
fever
cramps
nervous fever
gout
rheumatism

Ingredients
gentian tincture
guaiacum
guaiac gum
water
camphorated tulip
cardamon
cardamons tincture
mint water
mint
cold water
honey
balsamic
balsam of copaiba
barley
barley water
spirits

Places
Halifax
Nova Scotia

Source: Manuscript Notebook of Sarah Creighton Wilkins
Institution: Nova Scotia Archives | Source Origin: MacDonald Family Fonds | Reference: MG 1 No. 1 / Microfilm Reel 10,618

Description

A list specifying dosages for a variety of medications and amounts for medicinal ingredients.


Images
Transcription

Doses |   Elixir of Vitriol. 10 to 60. ^Adultdrops Stomachic Indigestion flatulence
_____
Gentian Tincture 1 to 2 drams in Water Stomachic & c. 3 or 4 times a day 3 doses
Volatile Tincture Guaiac gum 1 to 3 drams in water 2 or 3 times a day ditto
for the Chronic Gout & Rheumatism. --
Camphor Tulip. 2 to 4 Table Spoonfuls 3 times a day febrifuge Nervous fever
Cardamons Tincture 2 or 3 drams mint water, Stimulant Cramp &c.
Contrayerva powder. 20 to 40 grains in water. sudorific recent Cold.
A Ethir. 30 drops in Cold water Antispasmodic astma,
Cramp & flatulence
Balsam of Copaiva 20 to 30 drops in honey diuretic &
Balsamic - whites Glass & gravel
Bark   decoction 3 or 4 Table spoonfuls 3 times day relaxation
& weakness --
Nitric powder 5 to 20 Grains in Barley water Strangury
heat of Urine fever. S[---] spirit 20 to 60 take for ditto

Annotations
Gentian
Native to Asia, Europe, and the Americas, the roots of genus gentiana were used in making beverages as well as in remedies for a variety of ailments, including digestive disorders, fevers, and dyspepsia.
Guaiac Gum
A genus of flowering plants native to the subtropical and tropical regions of America, guaiacum was introduced to Europe in the sixteenth century and used to treat a variety of ailments, including syphilis. (Also guajacum)
Contrayerva powder
In his 1640 Theatrum Botanicum, John Parkinson describes the Contraserva plant: Contrayerva, sometimes termed Indian Spanish Counterpoyson, is a root that is native to Peru and the West Indies, that was later brought to Spain. It has a long history of being used as both a poison and a cure of poison, depending on its preparation.
Balsam of Copaiva
(Copaiba) An essential oil derived from the South American copaiba tree used for a variety of medicinal and cosmetic purposes. It has been found to have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and antihemorrhagic properties.