Composition of Gun-Powder / Method of Giving Additional Force to Gun-Powder

[ Composition of Gun-Powder / Method of Giving Additional Force to Gun-Powder ] Dr. William James Almon

Contributors
Contributor Role
Compiler
Contributor Name
Dr. William James Almon

Date: Late 18th century; exact date unknown.

Publication Format
Manuscript

Type
Miscellaneous

Ingredients
salt petre
sulphyr
charcoal
gunpowder
quick lime
oxygenated muriatric gas
nitre

Places
Halifax
Nova Scotia
England
France
Spain
Poland
Fogano
Tuscany
Italy

Source: Manuscript Notebook of Dr. William James Almon
Institution: Nova Scotia Archives | Source Origin: Almon Family Fonds | Reference: MG 1 / Microfilm Reel 10,045

Description

A table of gunpowder composition followed by instructions for giving it greater force with a method developed by Tuscan physician Francesco Baini, p. 257.


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Transcription

              Composition of Gun-Powder
The following are the proportions used at present in
England, France, Spain, Poland, and Italy for the
best kind of Gun-Powder

 

 

Eng.

Fran.

Swed.

Pol.

Italy.

Salt-petre

75

75

75

80

76 1/2

Sulphur

15

9 1/2

16

12

12 1/2

Charcoal

10

15 1/2

9

8

12 1/2

 

100

100

100

100

101 1/2

 

Method of giving additional force to Gun-Powder

 1Discovered by Dr. Francis Baini, of Fogano in TuscanyIf consists in adding to each pound of powder
four ounces of fresh quick lime well pulverized. The 
whole must then be well shaken, in order to make
it mix, after which it may be preserved in any vessel
closely shut, it is to be observed that when it is used,
the powder put into the pan must be pure, that 
is without any mixture of quick lime.

 2Vide Fourcroy; Chemistry Vol i- page 357M: Bertholett has discovered that oxygenated Muriatic Gas
recieved in a keg of caustic potash, forms a chrystallizable
neutral salt which detonates more strongly than Nitre