Charcoal for Cleaning Utensils, Improving Oral Hygiene, and Purifying Water

[ Charcoal for Cleaning Utensils, Improving Oral Hygiene, and Purifying Water ] Dr. William James Almon

Contributors
Contributor Role
Compiler
Contributor Name
Dr. William James Almon

Date: Late 18th century; exact date unknown.

Publication Format
Manuscript

Type
Cosmetic
Household
Medicine
Miscellaneous

Symptoms
scorbutic gums
offensive smell

Ingredients
fine charcoal powder
sand
potash
water
coarse charcoal powder

Places
Petersburg
Russia
Halifax
Nova Scotia

Source: Manuscript Notebook of Dr. William James Almon
Institution: Nova Scotia Archives | Source Origin: Almon Family Fonds | Reference: MG 1 / Microfilm Reel 10,045

Description

A description of the purifying uses of charcoal, p. 262.


Images
Transcription

Amongst many other singular properties of Charcoal, it
has lately been discovered, by a gentleman at Petersburg, that 
all sorts of glass vessels, and other utensils, may be purified
from long retained smells, and taints of every kind, in the 
easiest and most perfect manner, by rinsing them well out
with Charcoal reduced to a fine powder, after their grosser
impurities have been scoured off with sand and potash.
    Those people whose breath smells strong from a scorbutic
disposition of the gums, may at any time, get perfectly rid
of this bad smell, by rubbing and washing out the mouth
thoroughly with fine charcoal powder.
    This simple application at the same time, renders the 
teeth beautifully white.
    And that brown (or otherwise coloured) putrid stinking
water, may be deprived of its offensive smell, and render-
-ed transparent by means of the same substance.
    It would be of use for preserving water sweet, during
sea voyages, to add about 5 # of coarse charcoal powder
to every cask of water, it being only necessary afterwards
to strain the water off when wanted, through a linen
bag.